Co Creator:

Libby Seery

Libby Seery – Founder of Renaissance Life Therapies Ad.Dip.Psych, PGDip.CBT, Dip.Couns, Dip.NLP, Dip.Psych.Coach

All of my online courses are fully accredited with the CPD Standards Agency and offer students the opportunity to gain CPD credits/hours.

I am a Psychotherapist, Counsellor, and Therapeutic Art Practitioner.

I run a very successful practice in Harley Street, London which is recognised the world over as a centre of medical excellence.

I am a highly trained specialist with a wealth of experience, working with people from all walks of life; including referrals from charities I’m involved in, to very high profile clients from all over the world.  One of my specialist areas is working in crises prevention and intervention.  Although challenging, this is one of the most rewarding parts of my work.

My charity work has afforded me a visit to Buckingham palace, London and also the opportunity of “strutting my stuff” at a charity fashion event, very embarrassing and very thrilling too!

As well as my client work, I have had a number of works published and have appeared on TV and radio.

I am also the founder of Renaissance Life Therapies Training Academy, which offers courses in art therapy, counselling, CBT and other areas of self development.

As an accredited CPD training provider, I have more than 135,000 students, from 192 countries, and have been honoured with a number of awards for my contribution to education.

I also write and lecture in my subject, as well as training other doctors and counsellors in specialist areas of counselling and therapeutic art.

I’m proud to be a member of the Women’s Institute and I’m a huge advocate that mental health care should be available to everyone.

My Thoughts on Education

I’m passionate that everyone, young and old, from developing countries or those in the Western World on low income, can gain access to affordable education.

About eight years ago, I sponsored a little girl from Ghana.  It was quite literally life changing for me.  I was able to write to her and she wrote me back and we developed a wonderful friendship, even though we’ve never met!  Watching her grow and seeing how the sponsors had helped improve the quality of the children who lived in her village, it inspired me.  I decided then that I would like to work with the volunteers in Ghana, so I could sponsor the village school.  It was incredible to be able to send books, pencils and school equipment, knowing it would make such a difference to the children.

About me and why I’m such a staunch advocate for young girls and women, across the globe

Sadly, like so many other children, I had a difficult start to life.  I was brought up in a very neglectful, dysfunctional household, where there was a lot violence, abuse and a great deal of alcoholism.

One of the very earliest memories I have, is when I was about five years of age.  The police were called by neighbours in the early hours of the morning because of yet another disturbance.  I remember sitting on the stairs screaming as I was so terrified, having to watch my mother and father physically fighting and smashing the house up.   Unfortunately, this was to be a regular monthly or so occurrence, throughout my childhood and teens.

I remember that I always felt scared. I would be visibly trembling and I genuinely felt vulnerable to such a volatile environment.  But as the years passed, I was also becoming aware of how embarrassed I felt.  This was mainly because I was becoming closer in age to the young police officers whom would be called by neighbours to attend our house, yet again.  It made me feel so ashamed.

As a child, I would be called the most horrendous names by my brothers, who were 18 months and 3 years older respectively.  I was made to feel ashamed of being a girl, especially by my mother, and then as I hit puberty, she actively recruited my brothers, to join in her ongoing campaign of humiliation towards me, instructing them to hit me, and just because of the fact that I was physically changing from a child into a teenager.   

My brothers would both laugh and ridicule me at the size of my breasts, and make other personal and hugely inappropriate comments about my body.  I was made to feel such shame and guilt, all because I was a girl.

I remember that I always felt scared. I would be visibly trembling and I genuinely felt vulnerable to such a volatile environment.  But as the years passed, I was also becoming aware of how embarrassed I felt.  This was mainly because I was becoming closer in age to the young police officers whom would be called by neighbours to attend our house, yet again.  It made me feel so ashamed.

As a child, I would be called the most horrendous names by my brothers, who were 18 months and 3 years older respectively.  I was made to feel ashamed of being a girl, especially by my mother, and then as I hit puberty, she actively recruited my brothers, to join in her ongoing campaign of humiliation towards me, instructing them to hit me, and just because of the fact that I was physically changing from a child into a teenager.   

My brothers would both laugh and ridicule me at the size of my breasts, and make other personal and hugely inappropriate comments about my body.  I was made to feel such shame and guilt, all because I was a girl.

The morning after my fourteenth birthday, I started my periods.  It was an horrific day.   I can remember it like it was yesterday.  I spent hours and hours, trying to draw the strength and courage to tell her, even though I was told time and time again prior to this, that she didn’t want to know when “these things started”.  She could never say the word periods, because it was perceived as being dirty, or at least it was in her eyes when it was about me.

It took me to late afternoon to finally blurt it out to her.  I can remember shaking from my head to my toes, coupled with the shame and guilt that I’d already been subjected to.   

Although I’ve often thought about the actual words I spoke to her that day, I’m still not sure what I said, but I must have been clear enough that she understood what I was trying to say, because she became furious and started swearing at me, making it perfectly clear she didn’t want to know anything.  She didn’t give me any sanitary towels, that day, or any other in fact.  I was literally left to my own devices.

Even though I knew what periods were and what they involved, I remember feeling very frightened and alone.  That day she managed to compound my existing feelings of shame and guilt, making me feel so disgusting and worthless.

Although I did have some wonderful close friends growing up, I would have rather died, then to have shared with them how shameful life was like for me at home (although, looking back now, I wish I had been brave enough, as I know I would have been helped by them).

So, I just got on with it myself.  I didn’t get pocket money or have a job, so I couldn’t afford sanitary towels myself.  I had to use socks and rolls of toilet tissue, which made it difficult and uncomfortable to walk.

The most humiliating part of puberty for me was never being brought a bra.  I spent my entire time at senior school, binding my breasts with crepe bandages and trying to knot the children’s vests (I still wore) to my skirt in order to try and flatten my breasts, so I wouldn’t get bullied for not wearing a bra.

Although I wanted to go to college after my senior school, I had no choice but to go to work full time.  This meant earning money of my own, I could start to look after myself properly.

As I wouldn’t be paid until I had been there for a whole month, the first month working in my new job at a stockbrokers, in the financial district of London, was challenging to say the least.

It meant for the most part I had to wear my old school uniform, because my mother or father wouldn’t buy me any clothes.   My school blazer, skirt and a short sleeved blue shirt I had, was the same uniform I was wearing at the age of 13.  As you can imagine, I was far too big and I looked ridiculous at school, but much worse in a place of business where I was supposed to be taken seriously.

I felt like a freak.  Like everyone knew about my shameful home-life and I was redundant in any confidence whatsoever.  I have an awful memory of the office manager asking to speak to me, about addressing my attire in the workplace.  It was the most humiliating conversation.  In floods of tears, I had to explain that I had no money to buy any suitable work clothes.  She asked why my parents hadn’t helped in getting me prepared for working in an office.  It was then, that I had to admit that my life wasn’t great at home.  She didn’t ask any further questions.

So from my first month’s salary, I was able to buy some suitable clothes, but more importantly for me, I was able to buy my first bra and sanitary towels.

I suffered much depression and anxiety as a child, which carried on into my teens, into young adulthood, with much of my twenties, which was spent on medication.

The first time I went to university, by the time I paid for my accommodation and books, I was living off just over £5 a week – Believe me, you make it work if you have to.  I stayed focused on changing my life, putting one foot in front of the other….

Life couldn’t be better

I am the happiest person in the world now!  I couldn’t imagine ever being as content and as wonderfully happy as I am now.

I have achieved some amazing things in my life, and I couldn’t do it without the love of my new family of friends, their encouragement and support know no boundaries.

For the first time in my life, I genuinely feel unconditional love and I feel like I’m having my childhood, now that I’m in my forties!  I must say, it’s wonderful and incredibly special.

My most recent achievement which I’m particularly proud of, is learning to fly helicopters.  It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done, but the most thrilling.  I chose to learn in the R22, which is commonly considered the most difficult helicopter you can pilot.  I wanted to challenge myself that I could do this, and do it well!   

It took a lot of time and great commitment to studying for all nine exams.  But, I’ve loved every single minute of it and have become friends with the most wonderful people, whom I know will be great friends for life.  In fact I always refer to them as my helicopter family!

There are still some things I would like to achieve in my career as a psychotherapist, one of which involves working with the criminally insane.

To sum up then

Anyway, my message here, is to show people that regardless of the hardships you may have encountered, you really can change your life and make your own destiny.  Above all, you can be the happiest person ever.

Signing up for the amazing eight week’s retreat, will be the first step in changing your life for the better, and forever!

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